Tag Archives: books

Book Review: ‘Climate Change Simplified: A Recipe For Understanding’ By Thomas Anderl

ClimateChange

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As a researcher working in the field of atmospheric and climate science, nothing gave me more pleasure than the recent awareness and interest among general public about the climate crisis in front of us. It was indeed very frustrating to see the work of fellow researchers going down the drain because nobody apparently cares. It doesn’t matter how important or how serious the results are, it seems that nobody else is concerned about the state of the planet. General public doesn’t care; of course, they have more important and relevant issues to take care of, instead of addressing climate change which anyhow can wait. When we talk about climate, our discussion involves large time scales extending from hundreds to thousands of years. This creates an impression on general mind that climate issues are far off and their resolution can wait. Continue reading

Book Review: ‘City Of Nine Gates’ By Pankaj Rajput

City

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This week I am sharing with you my views on the book City of Nine Gates by Pankaj Rajput. First of all I thank BlogAdda for offering me to review this book. The format of this book is complex so that it cannot be classified into any particular category. It has a story containing brief and frequent episodes of time travel and fantasy. Indian philosophy is the backbone or rather the foundation of this work. In a way, you can say that Rajput has used the narrative to explain the basic concepts of Indian philosophy. Keeping this in mind, note that the narrative itself is of secondary importance here, whereas the philosophy remains the primary objective and highlight of this work. Also note that the success or failure of any published book depends not only on the writer but also on the publisher and editing staff. Continue reading

Book Review: ‘Your Brain, Explained: What Neuroscience Reveals About Your Brain and its Quirks’ By Marc Dingman

BrainExplained

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You may call me a slow reader; after all I took about three months for writing my last book review. But I am satisfied with my reading speed. In my opinion, it is highly improper not to give non-fiction books the effort and careful reading they demand and deserve. Non-fiction books, especially science books, are not meant for speed reading, and active involvement of the reader is essential to derive maximum benefit from the work. Following this argument, I am completely satisfied at having taken two full months in going through the book Your Brain, Explained: What Neuroscience Reveals About Your Brain and its Quirks by Marc Dingman. The title of the book speaks for itself and honestly speaking, I expected nothing less than 6 months of drudgery and mental torture while undertaking this seemingly Himalayan task. The book itself is not lengthy, being 256 pages long; however, it was the subject which scared me to death. But all my apprehensions turned out to be baseless fears of an empty mind. The book is educational in nature and far easier to follow than I had anticipated. The language of the book is neither too dull nor too exciting; it is simply modest and polite, and very easy to understand. Continue reading

Book Review: Infinity In The Palm Of Your Hand: Fifty Wonders That Reveal An Extraordinary Universe By Marcus Chown

Infinity

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Today I would share my views on the book Infinity In The Palm Of Your Hand by Marcus Chown. This is the first popular science book that I am reviewing on this blog and the second book by Marcus Chown that I have read. I got acquainted with Marcus Chown through his book We Need To Talk About Kelvin, which explained the scientific concepts behind everyday events and processes that we take for granted. I was so impressed with that book that when Infinity In The Palm Of Your Hand was offered to me for review, I grabbed it with both hands. Continue reading

Book Review: ‘Autumn Shadows: Memoir’ By Tomichan Matheikal

Matheikal

I am writing to you after a short gap. The reason is that I was busy reading Tomichan Matheikal’s new book “Autumn Shadows: Memoir” and it was very difficult to interrupt the reading to pen down any of my own thoughts. So I decided to first finish the task at hand and then share my views with you. No, it was not a pleasure reading, instead I was reading it in order to review it as a critic. So today I would share my thoughts and opinion of this book with you. Continue reading

Most Of Your Reasons For Not Pursuing Art And Literature Might Be Just Excuses

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In couple of previous articles, I have touched on the subject of role of arts in our lives and society. How is art capable of bringing about that change within ourselves is a subject for psychological and philosophical scrutiny. We will discuss it in detail some other time. It is generally assumed that in order to pursue art, one requires financial security and time. Having spent four decades actively pursuing arts, two decades science, and one decade languages, today I sincerely believe that that is not the case. Continue reading

An Assignment For Physics Lovers From 15 Park Avenue

15ParkAvenue

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In a country obsessed with politics and religion, it is quite rare to see any movie paying attention to science and scientists — that too fine attention. 15 Park Avenue (2005) by Aparna Sen is one such movie, which had received the National Film Award for best feature film in English.

I liked this movie for several reasons besides its screenplay and artistic merit. The foremost reason is that it brings nearly all my favourite actors and actresses under one roof — Shabana Azmi, Konkona Sen Sharma, Waheeda Rehman, Soumitra Chatterjee, Kanwaljit Singh, Rahul Bose, Dhritiman Chatterjee to mention only a few. And all of them performing under the expert direction of Aparna Sen who has shown her calibre more than once with movies such as 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981),  Yugant (1995), Paromitar Ek Din (2000) and Mr and Mrs Iyer (2002). What more could one ask for? Continue reading