Tag Archives: selfimprovement

Why You Ignore Your Mind And Why You Shouldn’t

I noted in an earlier post that the personality of any individual is made up of body, mind and soul. I stressed that the development of any individual should be harmonious and include growth on all three planes. As I pondered over that point, I realised that the subject is not so simple as it seems. In this post I mention two such additional aspects of the harmony of the three planes. At the same time, I encourage you to think over it and share your own insights on this subject.

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Why You Should Turn Your Passion Into Profession And What Makes It Difficult

Once question keeps popping up in my mind every now and then. Let me put it in this way. Everyone of us is educated, enters into some profession and earns a living. The rest of life is spent working hard, earning money which soon transforms into accumulating wealth, and then it all ends when we are old or retired, or both. Whenever someone asks why we undertake so much hardship, our quick answer is — financial security, our family responsibility, and above all, happiness. In a way, all reasons are related to each other and imply the same thing — happiness. My question is, instead of working so hard on something which we do not enjoy in order to earn a living so that we could be happy, why not start with happiness itself, i.e., do things that we enjoy and turn it into profession? That way life indeed would become fun and work would no longer be a labour. In fact, most of the time when we say we are tired, we actually mean that we are bored.

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Book Review: ‘Goodbye Phone, Hello World’ By Paul Greenberg

Image Source: NetGalley

Good Bye, Phone Hello World: 60 Ways to Disconnect from Tech and Reconnect to Joy by Paul Greenberg was the last book I read in 2020 and the first one that I am reviewing in 2021. In my opinion it is an important and an urgently needed book. That is the reason that I decided to start the book reviews this year with this book.

Good Bye Phone is about how we are losing out on our lives, our own interests, in small small bits and pieces, for the sake of something which is not even worth it. The focus of the whole book is to convey the urgency to get rid of smartphone addiction. In the first few pages of the book, the writer highlights the various ways in which smartphone is robbing you of your life. And remember that he is not just talking about the effect on your health or effect on your relationships. He tells you how seriously it is affecting your whole life and how you are being deprived of the various beautiful things which really mean to you.

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What is in Name? A Lot!

 

 

— Did I keep you waiting for long?
— No, not much. We too came just a while ago.
— Ordered?
— No, not yet. We were waiting for you to come. What would you like to have? Tea, coffee, cold drink?
— Tea.
— Any special one? Special, less sugar, more sugar, black tea, ginger tea, lemon tea…
— Stop stop. Nothing of that sort. Just ordinary, plain tea.
— Anything with it? Samosa, pakoda…
— Stop it man! Just go and order whatever you want to eat. I would take only tea.
— OK fine. As you wish. Chhotoo!
— Is that his name?
— No, just like that.
— Then?
— How could I know?
— Did you ask?
— Who cares!
 
How many people take for granted the name of the person who comes to clean their offices, or the postman, the milkman, tea man, canteen fellow, shopkeeper. Have you yourself ever been curious? It is strange that people hardwire to their brains the names of all cricketers, footballers — not from their own country but also from others, of movie stars — people whom one never meets, has no chance of meeting either, and it does not make any difference if one meets or not. But one doesn’t show the same enthusiasm to discover or simply query the name of the person whom one meets every day — on a routine basis. Simply because they are not important? But aren’t they?
 
It is not the same as the innumerable ways people call their little ones — king, queen, prince, princess, angel, fairy, pearl, diamond, bird. Also not the same as the nickname they put for them, sometimes a shortened form of their formal names, sometimes an entirely different name; or the ones that their classmates and friends choose for them — naughty, diminutive, stupid, and affectionate. But here, there is neither any affection, nor a circumvention for comparatively longer and complicated names. Here, it is complete apathy, lack of concern for the people whom one considers ‘less important’, their identity, in fact their existence in our world. It would not be practical to keep querying the names and remembering all of them of all the people one encounters in the journey through life — people whom one meets in buses, trains, trips, other places and cities. Instead, we are talking here about the people one meets daily, on a routine basis, who mean so much for our comfort, if not for survival, yet are taken for granted.
 
Then there are so many of us who can’t even take the smallest trouble to spell correctly (in writing) others’ names. Isn’t it simply an utter contempt and disregard towards the other person? All our big words of admiration and respect do not sound honest then. It hardly takes less than a minute to carefully observe the person’s name in its correct form and to commit it to memory. Even for few complicated words, especially from other cultures, one can invent formulae and mnemonics (without telling the person, of course).
 
Surely it all depends on whether and how much respect one wants to give the other person. If the answer is in negative, then what is the point in starting with the communication and connection at all? Let us not forget that the sweetest sounding word for any individual from any country and culture and speaking any language is not the name of God, instead it is one’s own name.
 
Now, here is something to cheer you up:
 
— Such a sweet child! What is your name, little one?
— Monu.
— No, no, not that. The school name.
— Bal Bharti Public School.
 
 

photo credit: Sobrinos via photopin (license)